2560 Leon Guinto Street

Singalong, Malate, Manila

Philippines

632-5677686

632-5597593

Text_2

SSC COMMUNITY

Institutional Research and Academic Development Office

irad 1Mission

The Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office, as a conduit of the VPAA Office, is committed to ensuring that structures and mechanisms are in place so that research capability, productivity, and utility are established, developed, and sustained.

Vision

The Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office envisions an academic community whose members share a set of beliefs, assumptions, values, and practices with respect to research activities with the end goal of developing and sustaining a culture of research.

Service Hours

Monday to Friday

From 7:30am to 4:30pm
(Lunch Break is from 11:30pm to 12:30pm)

Saturday

From 7:30am to 11:30pm

Contact Us

INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH AND ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
St. Scholastica’s College 

2560 Leon Guinto Street 
Malate, Metro Manila 
Philippines / P.O. Box 3153

Phone: (632) 567 – 7686 local 8190
Fax Number: (632) 559 – 6348 
E-mail: macnoy@yahoo.com

IRAD Office
Head & Staff

Prof. Marcelino Macapinlac, Jr.
Research Director

Prof. Elisa Bernadette Limson, RGC
Assistant Research Director

Ms. Cielo Borja
Office Assistant

Conducting research is one of the functions of an institution of higher learning. It is a very important activity that it should not be taken simply as a requirement particularly in the tertiary level or of any accrediting agency for the basic education level. Rather, it is an opportunity to learn, improve practices and even policies when necessary. It is an opportunity to grow, to learn from each other, and to keep ourselves updated. It is in learning unceasingly that we can impart knowledge and hone the skills of the students more effectively. It is in the implementation of educational researches that improvement both of pedagogical practices and student learning is achieved (Stafford, 2006).

As we continuously build the culture of research in St. Scholastica’s College, Manila across all units, we aim to have more researches in the areas of transformative leadership, peace education, curricular improvement and/or development, women and children advocacies, as well as environmental protection and preservation or ecological activism.

Transformative Leadership

The job of a leader today is not to create followers but to create leaders (Ralph Nader).

This kind of leadership is what we want all our leaders to imbibe. Transformative leadership (also known as transformational leadership) refers to the process whereby an individual engages with others and creates a connection that raises the level of motivation and morality in both the leader and the followers. It is about providing supportive climate, communicating high expectations, inspiring others that they may become committed to the realization of goals of the organization; it is about stimulating others to be more creative and innovative. It values both people and results, commitment, service, dedication, perseverance, giving of oneself, collaboration and empowerment; it is about walking with the people being led towards one direction and arriving at the same desired results. It is a kind of leadership that brings about change not only for the organization but for the larger community and the society as a whole.

With all these considered, transformative leaders then, see the need for a change and makes sure that such change will happen. They do not settle for mediocrity but excellence; for what has been in place for a long time but innovativeness and creativity.

Peace Education

If we are to identify what has not been achieved yet by our country and the world it would be peace. Conflicts, disagreements, division and the like have never been resolved. There is war over a piece of land, power and beliefs; injustices and violence seem to prevail. All these can never be addressed at an instance. Peace talks, winning over wars, and other peace initiatives and processes may just be addressing the issues of peace on a surface level. Peace and peace building has to start from within; it has to be imbibed and lived by every individual; and as Benedictine educators we continue to seek peace and pursue peace.

In the academe where we belong we can help create a culture of peace through peace education initiatives and programs. We can make curricular reforms where peace education is made part of lessons, discussions, and activities, which involve the process of acquiring the values, the knowledge and developing the attitudes, skills, and behaviors to live in harmony with oneself, with others, and with the natural environment. It is about “teaching encounters” that would enhance students’ desire for peace, of loving non-violent acts and deeds, of learning how to manage conflicts and most especially putting premium to justice and equality. (Harris and Synott, 2012), it is a kind of education that provides opportunity in learning to know about the real meaning of peace, learning to do and work for peace, learning to be a person for peace, and learning the tools to transform society (UNESCO Report in Promoting Quality Education, 2003).

Peace education is not limited to anti-nuclear activities or projects, it likewise addresses gender equality, environmental responsibility and stewardship, efforts to address communication gap, conflict management, establishing good relationships, understanding and respecting the integrity of God’s creation.

Curricular Improvement

We are a dynamic and a progressive teaching school. We offer what is relevant and what would make our students equipped, competent and ready to face the challenges ahead; not so much in content but more so in values and character formation. We can only realize this by having a very good curriculum implemented by competent faculty and administrators. Curriculum does not only speak of the subject areas or content to be covered, not only those that are written but the hidden curriculum as well. It would also include improvement and evaluation of existing practices especially in as far as instructional delivery and quality of learning outcomes are concerned across educational levels (primary, secondary, and tertiary). Curricular improvement encompasses as well various involvement of students in activities that provide significant learning experiences in school like co-curricular activities and extra-curricular activities.

Women and Children Advocacies

The emergence of globalization as believed to have been the answer to national development, even worsen the state of women in the country – peasant women were displaced, a significant percentage of women in the workforce remained unemployed or underemployed, privatization of maternal clinic that service marginalized women would no longer be affordable for a lot of them, women trafficking, sexual exploitation and abuse. These are but a few and the latter are even true for children.

A women college as we are and at the same time an institution that has been proactive in helping the poor and the marginalized sectors of society, would like to continue with its mission of evangelization – of bringing Christ to everyone especially the less fortunate. With the various programs that we have and those that are yet to be in place or conceptualized, there can still be areas to be explored or to look into.

With the given situation, it is likewise and therefore on the helm of St. Scholastica’s College, Manila to produce responsive women leaders of the country. Women leaders, who understand the plight of the poor and the marginalized and therefore have the courage to take action. Women, who would continue taking the lead on pursuing peace, and making a difference in this world.

Environmental Stewardship

We are all aware of the degrading condition of our environment. The worsening state of our environment continuously creates an ecological imbalance. We have been experiencing the effects of global warming, resulting to the so-called “natural catastrophe” but is actually man-made if we are going to trace the real cause.

St. Scholastica’s College, Manila has been unceasingly trying to respond to the call of saving mother earth. Various programs and projects have been in place; some were realized, some were not. Environmental awareness has been made part of the curriculum particularly in the fields of science and technology subjects. Co-curricular and extra-curricular organizations and activities likewise include projects and programs related to environmental protection.

However, there is still much to be desired and since stewardship is one Benedictine value that we want each and every member of the community to imbibe, we will continuously respond to protecting and preserving mother earth… we will untiringly value the integrity of God’s creation . . . for it is one of the so many ways to be true co-creator of God.

Poverty Alleviation

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, 2007) defines poverty as the inability to afford basic food and non-food items as what was seen in the four countries like Kenya, Tanzania, Swaziland and South Africa (UNEP, 2007). Poverty is also a major concern in other areas of the world including the Philippines. It is actually a global concern. In the Philippines for example, data released by the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) in February 2011 showed that poverty level in the country has improved from 2006-2009 in terms of subsistence incidence or proportion of food but one may have doubts about the credibility (NCSB, 2011)

John Daniel said that the road to poverty alleviation is through quality education. This is anchored and responsive to the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), whose first target is a call to reduce the proportion of people living on less than $1 a day to half the 1990 level by 2015, this is to say from 28.3% of all people in low and middle-income economies to 14.2% (UNESCO, 2006). If poverty will not be arrested the poor will become even poorer. They would remain inferior, low, powerless and hopeless, jobless, and will continue to experience unfair labor practices. All these would lead to the birth of malnourish and undernourished children, homelessness, criminal victimization, depression, parents that are punitive and at times family death.

There is also the so-called feminist perspective on poverty or “feminization of poverty”. This is brought about by the increasing number of single women, particularly single mothers and elderly women who experience or live in poverty (Cliffs Notes, 2012).

Conclusion

Benedictine education is value-laden and responsive to the call of the times. It is Christ-centered and values community, stewardship, a balance between prayer and work, service, and discipline to name a few. It is transformative and is anchored on its social orientation thrust. It believes in justice and advocates peace. Benedictine education creates leaders who can be God’s instruments in bringing about change in the society. It is through this kind of education that we become educational leaders who are sent for a mission; who never get tired of learning, so that in all things God may be glorified.

The Journal of Action Research Editorial Board is constituted as a support arm of the IRAD Office in the dissemination of research findings of the faculty members of the Grade School, High School, and College Units and members of the VPAA Academic Support Cluster doing action research or classroom-based research through the publication of these works in The Journal of Action Research(JAR). It is composed of the editor-in-chief, the associate editor, and the managing editor. The members shall come from three units (GS, HS, College) and are appointed by the IRAD Director with a fixed term of one year. (For the specific functions of the members of the JAR Editorial Board, please refer to specific functions of the members of the editorial board of the College Unit.)

The Scholarly and Creative Works Committee

Is tasked to evaluate the scholarly and creative works submitted by the grade school and high school faculty using the various evaluation tools created for this purpose.

A committee composed of 5 faculty members appointed by the Grade School Unit office unit evaluates the scholarly and creative outputs submitted by the faculty from from the Grade School Unit. Likewise, a committee composed of 5 faculty members appointed by the High School Unit Office evaluates the works submitted by the faculty from the High School unit. The committee members hold a term of office for one school year. Evaluated works receive credit points for research which are used in the application for promotion of faculty. The IRAD Assistant Director chairs this committee.

Specific Functions:

1. Classification of scholarly work based on genre

2. Classifies the scholarly work as a major or minor work.

3. Evaluates research work using the appropriate evaluation tools. (Please see evaluation instruments in the appendices of IRAD  manual.)

4. Submits data to the Promotions Board. (Please refer to the Promotion Scheme of the Grade School and High School units.)

Research Technical Committee

The Research Technical Committee is constituted to approve the merit of research proposals. The IRAD Director sits as the Chair of this committee. It is divided into two subcommittees – the Subcommittee on Empirical Research Works and Subcommittee on Creative Research Works. 

Each subcommittee is composed of (2) two members. However, in order to more competently rate the scholarly work submitted, a third evaluator is invited to join the committee in rating the rate output. The third evaluator must have a background and professional knowledge of the nature of the scholarly work to be evaluated. Hence, the third evaluator varies in each of the work evaluated.

The results of the evaluation of the submitted proposals will be communicated to the IRAD Director. The IRAD Director endorses and approves the budget to carry out the research based on the recommendations of this committee. It is the responsibility of the IRAD Office to inform in writing the proponents on the status of submitted research proposals. The members of the committee will receive an honorarium per reading of research proposals submitted.

Specific Functions:

1. Evaluate the merit of research proposals submitted by faculty members. An “Evaluation Guide for Submitted Empirical Research     Proposals” form will be used for the evaluation of research projects empirical in nature, while an “Evaluation Guide for Submitted Creative Works Proposals” form will be used for the evaluation of creative works submitted for funding.

2. Recommend ways on how proposals can be improved, if the initial readings of such proposals are not meritorious.

3. Communicate with the IRAD Director regarding the status of submitted research proposals.

Research Evaluation Committee

The primary function of the Research Evaluation Committee is to score submitted scholarly works using the grid on “Classification of Scholarly Work and Their Respective Maximum Points”. Evaluated works receive credit points for research which are used in the application for promotion of faculty. The IRAD Assistant Director chairs this committee. It is divided into two subcommittees – the Subcommittee on Empirical Research Works and Subcommittee on Creative Research Works.

Each subcommittee is composed of (2) two members. However, in order to more competently rate the scholarly work submitted, a third evaluator is invited to join the committee in rating the output. The third evaluator must have a background and professional knowledge of the nature of the scholarly work to be evaluated. Hence, the third evaluator varies in each of the work evaluated. 

Scholarly works submitted for promotion are objectively assessed as a major or minor work based on an instrument or scale which was constructed for this purpose. The instrument is based on a 5 point scale. The response choices range from Very Great Extent, Great Extent, Moderate Extent, Low Extent, and Not at All with scores ranging from four (4) to zero (0) respectively. The scale contains 10 items that describe a major research output. Hence, scholarly works earning scores ranging from 35 to 40 are classified as a major work. Scholarly works earning a score of 34 and below are classified as a minor work. Members of this committee receive honoraria for scoring submitted scholarly works.

Specific Functions:

1. Classify scholarly works according to the different genre of research as stipulated in the “Description of Various Scholary Works.”
2. Score the different submitted scholarly works using the grid on “Classification of Scholarly Work and Their Respective Maximum Points.”

Deliberate on the Best Empirical Research and Best Creative Research Works for the school year.

The Editorial Board

The Editorial Board is constituted as a support arm of the IRAD Office in the dissemination of research findings through the publication of scholarly works in The Scholastican Journal (TSJ), the Journal of Creative Works (JCW), and the Journal of Student Research (JSR). It is composed of the editor-in-chief, the associate editor, and the managing editor. The members are appointed by the IRAD Director with a fixed term of one year. The board is also responsible in the publication of the College Unit’s official newsletter, Insight.

Specific Functions:

1. The Editor-in Chief

• The Editor-in-Chief has the overall editorial responsibilities for the publication of the Journals in coordination with the IRAD Director.

• The Editor-in-Chief, assisted by the rest of the editorial staff, solicits research papers for the journals and invites colleagues to contribute to the journal.

• S/he initially receives the submitted manuscript for publishing, reviews them, and assesses their quality. S/he may recommend acceptance, resubmission or rejection of the documents.

• S/he delegates the editing work to the rest of the editorial staff when a manuscript is accepted for publishing. After the authors complete their required revisions on their papers according to the external reviewers and editorial team recommendations, the manuscripts are submitted back to the Editor-in-Chief who finally reads, edits and approves them for printing.

• The main concern of the Editor-in-Chief is the content of the manuscript. S/he edits these, when necessary, to improve their written quality. S/he cross-checks the data within the manuscript and ensures that the data are authentic, accurate and complete. S/he also checks the content flow, writing style, grammar, spelling, and conformity of citations and references to the APA style before s/he approves them for printing.

• S/he is in charge of coordination with the authors of the documents in matters of substantial editing. S/he also discusses and resolves with the authors any potential ethical or legal problems found in the manuscript, such as libelous or defamatory statements or breach of copyright.

• S/he, together with the Managing Editor, sets the publishing schedule, and ensures that the entire publishing process runs smoothly and within schedule.

• S/he organizes the editorial staff meetings to set editorial goals in accordance with the institute’s policies, to develop action plans and to review the work progress.

• S/he represents the journal at meetings and conferences.

• At any time the Editor-in-Chief may delegate part of his/her tasks to the Managing Editor and the other editors as he deems appropriate or necessary.

2. Associate Editor

• The Associate Editor primarily reviews and edits research documents for publication from the original to the final form. S/he works collaboratively in the other aspects of production to ensure a well written journal and its timely completion.

• S/he assists the Editor-in-Chief in reviewing and evaluating the submitted documents and in coordinating with the authors in matters of content and major editing.

• S/he works with the Managing Editor on the editing process and the journal layout.

• S/he assists the Copy Editor/Proofreader in checking the facts within the documents for potential legal issues and for consistency, accuracy and completeness. They work closely in copy editing and proofreading the documents in accordance with the APA style.

• The Associate Editor assists in the proofreading of the final proofs, including general layout, paging, text alignment, spacing of the lines, the font style consistency, and other elements of proofreading, prior to the final printing of the journal.

3. Managing Editor

• The Managing Editor is responsible for managing the operations of the journal.

• S/he assists the Editor-in-Chief in ensuring a smooth work flow and a scholarly quality of the journal.

• S/he oversees the initial editing process and ensures that all documents conform to the APA style. Thereafter, s/he submits all copy-edited documents to the Editor-in-Chief.

• The Managing Editor, in collaboration with the Editor-in-Chief, decides the arrangement and compilation of the documents in the journal. S/he is in charge of lay outing the documents in journal form. S/he is in charge of preparing the Table of Contents and the Preface, and assigning the page numbers of the journal.

• The Managing Editor and the Editor-in-Chief jointly prepare the publication schedule. The Managing Editor implements the schedule. S/he coordinates and oversees all phases of the production and the printing process, and ensures the completion and distribution of the journal in a timely manner.

• The Managing Editor, assisted by the Associate Editor and the Copy Editor, proofreads the final proofs, including general layout, order of pages, text alignment, spacing of the lines, the font style consistency, and other elements of proofreading, prior to the final printing of the journal.

• The Managing Editor enforces the journal’s policies and procedures, consistent with the policies of the institute, regarding publication and printing of the journal. S/he manages the contract with the printing press, security of the documents, copyrights, anti-plagiarism, legal concerns and other similar issues.

• S/he handles stipend payments for authors and reviewers outside the Editorial Board whose specialization may be needed, and temporary personnel who may be hired for specific purposes.

• S/he attends the Editorial Board meetings and keeps the editorial staff informed of production and printing status.

• S/he reports directly to the Editor-in-Chief. In his/her absence the Managing Editor undertakes the duties of the Editor-in-Chief in an acting capacity.

Is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes the scholarly papers of the faculty members of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila. The journal aims to provide a forum for faculty members to share their expertise, professional practices and innovations in their respective fields. It seeks to sustain crucial discourse across academic disciplines in order to contribute to the vitality and effectiveness of teaching, learning, and research/scholarship.

The journal is published annually by the Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila in coordination with The Scholastican Journal (TSJ) Editorial Department. 

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS: General Articles, Reports, Book Reviews.

FACULTY

TITLE

UNIT
DEPARTMENT

YEAR

Alma Santiago-Espartinez

Hatred and Violence in Light of Emmanuel Levinas’ Disinterested Responsibility

Philosophy

2013

Noel Christian A. Moratilla

Narrativizing Marginality and Hope: Testimonial Narratives of Students in a Night School

Languages and Literature

2013

Lucris Carina Agnir-Paraan

Losing the Filipino and the Female Voice in Postcolonial Translation: How the West Has Won

Languages and
Literature

2013

Richard Pulmones

Personal Epistemology and Learning in a Chemistry Classroom

Education

2013

Maria Victoria F. Trinidad

Thesis Quality, Emotional Reactions, and Coping Resources of College Thesis Writers of St. Scholastica’s College

Psychology

2013

Michael G. Antonio

Political Perspective of the Scholasticans on the Gloria Macapagal Arroyo Presidency before the 2010 Presidential Elections

Social Sciences

2012

Marian A. Caampued

Ang Paghahanap ng Pagdadalumat sa Feminismo sa Igorotismo

Social Sciences

2012

Angelina L.V. Gutierrez

What College Faculty Climate Assessment Reveals about the Rewards and Challenges of the Profession and its Relationship to Spirituality

Theology

2012

Rommel Maglaya

Development and Integration of Creative Drama-Based Activities to Enhance the Oral Communication Skills in English of Intermediate Pupils

Languages and Literature

2012

Noel Christian A. Moratilla

Education and Resistance: Testimonios for Critical Pedagogy and Literacy

Languages and Literature

2012

Ralph Sabio

Internationalization of Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines: Current Trends and Challenges

Business Management

2012

Eduardo A. Bolanos

Specific Comprehension Strategies Good L2 Readers Use When They Process Expository Texts in Linear and Nonlinear Environments

Languages and Literature

2011

Marlon S. Delupio

Ang Bayan ng Malolos sa Panahon ng Unang Republika – Anim na Buwan Bago ang Sigwa ng Digmaan (Steyenbre 14, 1898 – Marso 31, 1899)

Social Sciences

2011

Marlon S. Delupio

Ang Pag-aaral ng mga Kababaihan sa Ilalim ng Patakarang Pang-edukasyon ng mga Amerikano (1898-1918)

Social Sciences

2011

Elisa Bernadette E. Limson

Students’ Perception of the Effectiveness of Highly Rated Tertiary Instructors

Psychology

2011

Marcelino M. Macapinlac, Jr.

Ang Kahalagahan ng Katangiang Pangkapaligiran sa Pagkakatatag ng Bayan ng Los Banos noon Dantaon 17-19

Social Sciences

2011

Juliana Moonette S. Manrique
Angelina L.V. Guttierez

Music and Peace Values in Action: Engaging Students in the Music Appreciation Course

School of Music

2011

Noel Christian A. Moratilla

Political Overtures: The Songs of Yano as Counternarratives

Languages and Literature

2011

Ralph Sabio

Paradigm Shift in Business Education: A Call for New Pedagogy

Business Management

2011

Irish C. Sioson

Organizational Patterns, Rhetorical Moves, and Diction in Filipino and American Presidential Campaign Blogs

Languages and Literature

2011

 

 

Is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal that publishes action research projects of Grade School, High School, and College faculty members and of the members of the academic support cluster of the Office of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila. This journal serves as a venue for sharing of discussions and/or reflections on concrete and practical issues concerning academic and administrative practices which makes use of inquiry as a tool in improving effectiveness of these practices.

The journal is published by the Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office. The IRAD Office in coordination with the Editorial Board oversees the editing, compiling, and printing of the journal. 

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS: Action Research, Short Reports (Profile Reports), Classroom-based Research (any form of inquiry done with the intent that the research will inform, improve, and/or change practices in the future)

FACULTY

TITLE

UNIT
DEPARTMENT

YEAR PUBLISHED

Alma Consolacion S. Alcantara

Predicted Grade Point Average and the Actual Grade Point Average of First Year High School Students of St. Scholastica’s College Manila

High School
Guidance

2014

Michael G. Antonio

Participative Governance: A Descriptive Study of Proposed Changes in Administrative Rules and Procedures from the Tertiary Students of St. Scholastica’s College

Social Sciences

2014

Winma Jane P. Carvajal

Students’ Perceptions on Peer-Written Feedback in Narrative Essays

High School

2014

Florabelle R. Cunan

Evangeline S. Banta

The Importance and Efficiency in Technology and Livelihood  Education Modules of Students Across Year Levels

High School

2014

Ma. Angeles Imelda L. Garcia

Learning Competencies of Pupils Before and After the integration of Movements

Grade School

2014

Rea L. Jimenez

A Study on Co-curricular Club Membership of the High School Unit: A Mix Method Approach

High School

2014

Elisa Bernadette Entao-Limson

Mary Joy Rosales-Orante

Froilyn Villas-Lunaria

Maria Victoria F. Trinidad

The Assessment of the Importance and Deficiencies in Research Skills Among College Students

Psychology

Social Sciences

Education

2014

Sheryl J. Sombilon

Factors Affecting Student Concept Formation Towards Planned Action in Environmental Education

High School

2014

France Marie J. Sumang

St. Scholastica’s College: Graduate Tracer Study 2011

Career Placement

2014

Mark Anthony M. Velasco

Making Classrooms Alive: An Exploratory Case of the Instructional Design Theory

Social Sciences

2014

Ma. Lourdes N. Cura

Academic Profile of Year 1 Students Based on Year-End Deliberation Results

High School

2013

Arnel D. Daliva, 
Carolyn M. Aquino,
Wilma Q. Cabandi,
Royalyn F. Dela Cruz,
Hansel C. Geneta,
Felina P. Ilao,
Ferdinand C. Japon,
Ruben S.Valenton, Jr.

A Qualitative Study on the Relevance of the Christian Living Education Program to the Selected High Performing 4th Year Students of St. Scholastica’s College, Manila

High School

2013

Rosalie B. Emaas
Sarah Jean O. Tiangco

The Competencies of Scholasticans in 6th Grade Mathematics

Grade School

2013

Daisy U. Espina,
Norelyn D. Belaro,
Ma. Rosario L. Decipulo,
Noel-Norien S. Isidro,
Patricia Barbara D. Isidro,
Ma. Lourdes N. Cura

The Effect of the Use of Technology to a Targeted Competency of the Students in Studying the Social Sciences: A Classroom-Based Research

High School

2013

Armand Anthony L. Galicia, Michael Lord Malasigue,
Sheryl J. Sombilon

Performance of the 1st Year Students in the Pre- and Post-Tests of the General Science Diagnostic Exam

High School

2013

Ma. Louisa D. Joaquin

Taking the National Achievement Test (NAT) Challenge: A Study on the NAT Performance in Language of Grade Six Students of SY 2010-2011; 2011-2012

Grade School

2013

Jonna Marie A. Lim

A Classroom-Based Action Research on Error Correction in the Narratives of Grade 7 Students of St. Scholastica’s College, Manila

High School

2013

Aileen S. Magbanua,
Orlando E. Dulatre, Jr.,
Kriss V. Eusebio,
Rea L. Jimenez,
Madeline C. Marasigan,
Beulah P. Policarpio,
Margarette Kean C. Villarin

A Program Assessment of Physical Education, Health and Music Area Modules

High School

2013

Chloe Socorro K. Ramos

A Study on Attrition Rate of the College Unit

Academic Support

2013

Goldine B. Ramoso

Achieving Better Comprehension of Science Concepts With Code-Switching as Medium of Instruction

Grade School

2013

Veronica M. Saddul

Samuel S. Bautista

Analysis of Mathematics Entrance Competencies of First Year Students

High School

2013

Julita P. Santos, 
Maria Isabel Ranella S. Diaz,
Toni Elaine S. Emala

The Profile of 6th Grade Students’ Performance in the Different Areas of Science

Grade School

2013

 

Is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes creative work articles of the faculty members of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila. The journal aim to provide a forum for faculty members to share their expertise, professional practices and innovations in the creative discipline. 

The journal is published annually by the Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila in coordination with The Journal of Creative Works (JCW) Editorial Department. 

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS: Creative work articles, Critique Papers, Art Reviews.

FACULTY

TITLE

UNIT
DEPARTMENT

YEAR

POEMS

Jan Henry M. Choa, Jr.

Mga Haiku ng Pagkakataon sa Iba’t Ibang Panahon: Isang Paglalarawan ng Bukang-liwayway at Takipsilim ng Buhay

Languages and Literature

2014

Sr. M. Rosalina R. Fajardo, OSB

On the Pilgrim Way – A Missionary’s Journey

High School

2014

Sr. M. Roselita T. Geronimo, OSB

Creative Visualization: The Interconnectedness of Faith and Science

College

2014

Noel Christian A. Moratilla

Of Order and Chaos: Explanatory Notes on my Poems

Languages and Literature

2014

Nomeriana S. Ordanza

Ang Adhika

High School

2014

Ma. Sjenica C. Sevilla

Of Love and Men

Social Sciences

2014

PERSONAL ESSAYS

Ruth M. Gadia

Personal Essays on Learning from Students

Grade School

2014

SHORT STORIES

Jan Henry M. Choa, Jr.

Ang Pakikipagsapalaran ni Kabyo sa Ilalim ng Karagatan: Isang Metapora ng Tao at ng Lipunan

Languages and Literature

2014

Yasmin Fides R. Nuguid

Getting Tipsy with Love

High School

2014

MIXED GENRE

Yasmin Fides R. Nuguid

The Foreshadowing of a Love Story

High School

2014

LITERARY TRANSLATIONS

Lucris Carina Agnir-Paraan

Nakaka-high blood pa rin ba ang Pugad Baboy kapag in-Ingles?

Languages and Literature

2014

PHOTOGRAPHS

Noel-Norien S. Isidro

“In Art there are no mistakes, just happy accidents.” – Bob Ross

High School

 

2014

Clyde Ericson H. Nolasco

Faith and Modernity

Grade School

2014

PAINTINGS

Thelma Llorico-Badon

Patterns and Personal Characterization

Fine Arts and

Interior Design

2014

Roland V. Saldivar

Painterly Pictures in Pointillism

Information Technology

2014

2013

Cristina Dimaguila-Macascas

Sa Pagdatal ng Bukas

Languages and Literature

2013

Noel Christian Moratilla

Umb/rage and Other Jottings

Languages and Literature

2013

Mae Rafanan

Homecoming

Psychology

2013

Roland Saldivar

Beach Vendor

Information and Technology

2013

Benjamin Cabrera

“Dialogue with Pablo’s Guernica” 51 Filipino and Spanish artists paint a painted painting

Fine Arts and Interior Design

2013

Joselito Kayaban

Imaging Peace

Fine Arts and Interior Design

2013

Is an annual publication that features the best research papers produced by thesis writers from the different undergraduate courses offered at St. Scholastica’s College-Manila. The journal aims to provide exemplars of good research writing to current thesis writers, their thesis advisers, as well as students of Methods of Research. At the same time, it also aims to serve as a forum where students can share with the larger research community the valuable contribution they have made to research in their respective fields.

The journal is published by the Institutional Research and Academic Development (IRAD) Office of St. Scholastica’s College-Manila in coordination with the Journal of Student Research (JSR) Editorial Board.

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS: Abridged Version of Chosen Undergraduate Theses, one per department

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Is the previous version of The Scholastican Journal. 

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS: General Articles, Reports, Book Reviews.

FACULTY

TITLE

UNIT
DEPARTMENT

YEAR

Don Amorsolo

 

My Works

(Best Major Work, SY 2004-2005)

Fine Arts & Interior Design

2010

Maria Victoria Trinidad

 

Counselor Characteristics, Practices, and Perceived Effectiveness

(Best Minor Work, SY 2007-2008)

Psychology

2010

Elisa Bernadette E. Limson

 

The Development of an Academic Support Program for At-risk Psychology Students

(Best Minor Work, SY 2007-2008)

Psychology

2010

Johnathan Rondina

Sufferance, Self-sacrifice and the Filipino in Diasporic Cinema: Representations of the OFW and the Experience of Migrant Labor in Contemporary Philippine Flms

(Best Minor Work, SY 2008-2009)

Mass Communication

2010

Michael G. Antonio

Applying Governance Principles in a Regulatory Framework for the Domestic Microfinance Sector

Social Sciences

2010

Eduardo A. Bolanos

Reading in the 21st Century: What Theories Have to Say

Languages and Literature

2010

Rebecca Cacho

Towards a More Effective Sacramental Theology

Theology 

2010

Marlon S. Delupio

 

Tulang Sakdalista: Isang Pag-aalsa at Pakikibaka sa Likof ng mga Kataga

(1930-1940)

Social Sciences

2010

Marcelino M. Macapinlac, Jr.

Art as a Propaganda: Film and Theater during the Japanese Occupation of the Philippines

Social Sciences

2010

Juliana Moonette S. Manrique

The Raison D’etre of Avante Garde Music: A Stylistic Review of Influential Contemporary Composers

Music

2010

Michael G. Antonio

 

Revisiting the Theoretical Heritage of Public Administration: Evolution and Development

Social Sciences

2009

Maria Cristina D. Dizon

 

Women Managers Perception of the Glass Ceiling Effect on Their Work Performance, Organization Commitment and Promotion in the Hotel Industry

HRM

2009

Angelina L.V. Gutierrez

Embarking on a Spiritual Journey in the Footsteps of St. Paul

Theology

2009

Juliana Moonette S. Manrique

 

A Cognitive Keyboard Pedagogy for the Applied Music Education of Adult Beginners

School of Music

2009

Pamela Miras

Rights: A Series of Public Announcement on Human Rights in the Philippines

Mass Communication

2009

Noel Christian A. Moratilla

Politicizing the Second Language Classroom

Languages and Literature

2009

Christine Odette C. Negado

Paradise Here on Earth

Languages and Literature

2009

Richard Pulmones

 

Exploring the Metacognitive Profiles of Selected Students from Participating SMIIC Schools

Education

2009

Ralph A. Sabio

 

The Learning Style Preference of the Students in the School of Commerce, SSC Manila

Business

Management

2009

Lars Raymund C. Ublado

Kamalayan sa Kamatayan ng mga Tagalog: Pananaw Mula sa Kasaysayan

Social Sciences

2009

 

 

 

The College Faculty News Letter of St. Scholastica’s College, Manila.
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